The Tao of Computing:
A Down-to-Earth Approach to Computer Fluency
 
by Henry M. Walker Jones and Bartlett Publishers
 

This page provides links to color versions of the figures and images presented in Henry M. Walker, The Tao of Computing: A Down-to-earth Approach to Computer Fluency, Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2005.

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Except where other credits are given, all materials copyrighted by Henry M. Walker, 2003-2004, and by Jones and Bartlett, 2005.

Chapter Figures Notes
Chapter 1
How are computers organized?
Overview of Figures for Chapter 1 (caution: slow load time) composite
Figure 1.1: Reading, adding, and displaying numbers sketch
Figure 1.2a: A ribbon of parallel wires, with a connector at one end photograph
Figure 1.2b: Expansion slots, connected by parallel wires photograph
Figure 1.3: Diagram of multiple components connected via a bus sketch
Figure 1.4: The PowerPC 603 microprocessor from Figure 1: B. Burgess et al, ''The PowerPC 603 Microprocessor'', Communications of the ACM, V. 37:5, June, 1994. p. 35. (c) 2002 ACM, Inc. Not available on this Web site.
Figure 1.5a: A ceramic casing for the PowerPC 603 photograph by Ed Dudak
Figure 1.5b: A ceramic casing for the Pentium Chip photograph
Figure 1.6: A Compaq card containing a Pentium chip sketch
Figure 1.7: A Compaq desktop computer sketch
Chapter 2
How are data represented (and who cares)?
Overview of Figures for Chapter 2 (caution: slow load time) composite
Figure 2.1: A Textual Image image by Fred Hagemeister
Figure 2.2a: Foliage -- Original Version (1,124,557 bytes) photograph
Figure 2.2b: Medium Resolution in gif format (59,001 bytes) photograph
Figure 2.2c: High Resolution in jpeg format (60,668 bytes) photograph
Figure 2.3a: Library Shelves -- Original Picture (868,551 bytes) photograph
Figure 2.3b: Medium Resolution gif format (50,790 bytes) photograph
Figure 2.3c: High Resolution jpeg fomrat (47,301 byes) photograph
Figure 2.4: Picture A for Discussion Question 4
Multiple cloud-to-ground and cloud-to-cloud lightning strokes during night-time. Observed during night-time thunderstorm.
Credit: C. Clark, NOAA Photo Library, NOAA Central Library; OAR/ERL/National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL)
Public domain photo available
Figure 2.5: Picture B for Discussion Question 4
Bond Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia
Credit: John and Karen Hollingsworth, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Public domain photo available
Figure 2.6: Picture A for Exercise 4
Armillaria spp.
Credit: Joseph O'Brien, plant pathologist, Forest Health Protection Unit, U.S.Forest Service
Public domain photo available
Figure 2.7: Picture B for Exercise 4
Food Guide Pyramid
Credit: The U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
Public domain photo available
Figure 2.8: Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge, Hawaii
Credit: John and Karen Hollingsworth, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Public domain photo available
Chapter 3
Where are programs and data stored?
Overview of Figures for Chapter 3 (caution: slow load time) composite
Figure 3-1: Hierarchical View of Computer Storage sketch
Figure 3-2: A Typical Disk Organization sketch
Figure 3-3: Levels of Computer Memory sketch
Chapter 4
What is an operating system and what does it do?
Chapter 5
How are software packages developed?
Chapter 6
What should I know about the sizes and speeds of computers?
Figure 6.1: Air fares between selected cities in the Midwest sketch
Chapter 7
What can computers do for me?
Figure 7.1: Processing steps for a simple Turing Machine sketch
Chapter 8
How are computers connected?
Overview of Figures for Chapter 8 (caution: slow load time) composite
Figure 8.1: Four basic types of wire photograph
Figure 8.2a: RJ-11 Jacks and Sockets: Front View photograph
Figure 8.2b: RJ-11 Jacks and Sockets: Back Vuew photograph
Figure 8.3: An RJ-45 Jack and Socket photograph
Figure 8.4: Sockets on the Back of an Apple Macintosh PowerBook G4 Laptop Computer photograph
Figure 8.5: Star, Ethernet, and Token-ring Networks sketch
Figure 8.6: Four Local Star Networks, Connected in a Network sketch
Figure 8.7: A Hierarchy of Hubs sketch
Figure 8.8: Two Segments Connected with a Bridge sketch
Figure 8.9: A Wireless Network with 2 Portable and 2 Stationary Computers sketch
Chapter 9
How do users share computer files?
Overview of Figures for Chapter 9 (caution: slow load time) composite
Figure 9.1: Three separate computer and file systems, connected by e-mail sketch
Figure 9.2: Three file systems, together with a common file server sketch
Figure 9.3: Remote file access supplemental sketch
Chapter 10
When can I consider my personal data secure?
Chapter 11
How does the Internet work?
Figure 11.1: The IP number hierarchy for computers at Grinnell College
Chapter 12
How private (or public) are Web interactions? (Word format / html format)
Chapter 13
How do Web applications work?
Overview of Figures for Chapter 13 (caution: slow load time) composite
Figure 13.1: Processing an html page sketch
Figure 13.2: Processing a page utilizing postscript formatting instructions sketch
Figure 13.3: Formed used by the Grinnell College Mail Service screen shot courtesy of Grinnell College
Figure 13.4: Processing a Web page with scripting sketch
Figure 13.5: Processing Simple e-mail sketch
Figure 13.6: Processing Multimedia in e-mail sketch
Sidebar: Bellcore's Telephone Chords in the first MIME e-mail message photograph by Nathaniel Borenstein
Chapter 14: Can everyone access computers and the Web?
Figure 14.1: Levels of computer and Internet access sketch
Chapter 15
Can I use Web-based materials in the same way as more traditional sources?
Chapter 16
Can computers think (now or in the future)?
Figure 16.1: Setup for the Turing Test preliminary sketch


This document is available on the World Wide Web as

     http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/~walker/fluency-book/figures/figures.shtml


created July 25, 2003
last revised January 14, 2005

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For more information, please contact Henry M. Walker at walker@cs.grinnell.edu.