CSC 161 Grinnell College Fall, 2011
 
Imperative Problem Solving and Data Structures
 
 

Laboratory Exercise on Functions

Robot Hoedown

Passing Primitive Variables

  1. Make a file named hoedown.c and set it up in the standard way.

  2. Copy the following function into your program and describe what it does:

    int
    yoyo (int reps) 
    {
      int i;
    
      for (i = 0; i < reps; i++) 
        { 
          rForward (1, .5); 
          rBackward (1, .5); 
        } 
                      
       sleep (3); 
                      
       reps *= 3; 
                      
       return reps; 
    } // yoyo
  3. Make an int variable, repetitions, and set it to 2.

    • What does calling the following call do?

      yoyo (repetitions);
      • Does making this call twice change how many times the robot yoyos in each call?

    • What does the following call do?

      repetitions = yoyo (repetitions);
      • Does making this call twice change how many times the robot yoyos in each call?

    • What is the difference between the two calls?

  4. Make a prediction of what will happen if you nest calls to yoyo in the following manner:

     yoyo (yoyo (repetitions));
  5. Test out your nested call and explain what happened.

Passing Arrays to Functions

  1. Write another function, swings, with the following signature:

    void swing (double speeds[], double durations[], int args)

    This function should have the following properties:

    • The Scribbler should turn for each argument with the associated speed and duration

    • If the current index of the command is an even number, it should turn right

    • If the current index of the command is an odd number, it should turn left

    • Hint: Consider using the % operator to determine whether the index is even or odd.

  2. Now test out your function to make sure it works. Be sure to use at least four different durations and speeds.

  3. Copy the following function into your program, and make sure you understand what it does:

    void
    divide_swings (double times[], int args)
    {
     int i;
                      
     for (i = 0; i < args; i++)
      times[i] /= 3;
    } // divide_swings
  4. Predict what will happen if you make the following calls in your main method, in this order:

    swing (speeds, times, num_moves);
    divide_swings (times, num_moves);
    sleep (3);
    swing (speeds, times, num_moves);
  5. Now test it out and explain what happened and why this is possible.

More Passing of Arrays

  1. Write a program which uses the rGetObstacleAll() function and then displays each obstacle value. Then, your program should call a function which modifies each element in your obstacle array and turns it into the average of the three values. Then, your program should display the averaged obstacle values. All of your functions should be of void return type, so you will have to make your functions take arrays in by reference.

Reminder: Complete Evaluation Form

When you have finished this lab, be sure to fill out its evaluation form in the "Lab Evaluation" section for CSC 161 on Pioneer Web.