Hypermedia: Some Technology, Some Implications (Fall 1999)


Readings

The books on this reading list will be supplemented by a number of shorter readings.

On Hypertext

Bolter, Jay David (1991). Writing Space: The Computer, Hypertext, and the History of Writing. (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum and Associates.)

This book serves as the primary text for discussion in the class. It is likely that we will read it in the first few weeks of class.

Rebelsky, Samuel and Stuhr, Rebecca (1999). Hypermedia 101: The Technology and Its Implications. Online resource available at http://www.math.grin.edu/~rebelsky/Hypermedia101/. (Root page created March 23, 1999; Last modified March 23, 1999; Last visited March 23, 1999.)

Some of our longer notes (and nascent essays) on topics for this course. We'll do our best to provide you with printed versions when it is appropriate to do so.

Writing, Reading, and More

Required

Booth, Wayne C.; Colomb, Gregory G.; and Williams, Joseph (1995). The Craft of Research. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

This is one of the texts that you will use to ground your learning of academic skills. You should turn to it for advice on doing library research and on developing sound arguments.

Corbett, Edward P. J., & Finkle, Sheryl L. (1998). The Little English Handbook: Choices and Conventions, Eigth Edition. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley Longman.

A nice, small, text on the fundamentals of writing. I prefer this to The College Writers Reference. We'll use this when we talk about some details of your prose.

Williams, Joseph (1995). Style: Toward Clarity and Grace. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

This is one of the texts that you will use to ground your learning of academic skills. You should turn to it to hone your writing.

Williams, Joseph and McEnerney, Lawrence (1995). Writing in College: A Short Guide to College Writing. Chicago, IL: The Humanities Collegiate Division of The College of The University of Chicago. Online resource at http://college.uchicago.edu/writing-program/resources/writing_in_coll ege/index.htm (visited March 30, 1999; reportedly last modified September 1998; last modified March 11, 1999).

This is where you'll start your consideration of writing. It's a relatively short discourse on what it means to write for at the college level, with particular attention paid to thesis statements and arguments.

Recommended

Fulwiler, Toby and Hayakawa, Alan R. (1998). The College Writer's Reference. Prentice Hall.

For those of you who need to work on your fundamental writing skills (not on fine tuning, but on things like run-on sentences), this is a good reference. It is also the College's general reference for students in tutorial. This text is recommended and not required.

Dobbs, Elizabeth (1998). Dr. Syntax. Online resource at http://www.grinnell.edu/individuals/dobbs/DrSyntax/index.html (visited 21 August 1999; dated 1998; last modified 13 July 1999).

If we decided to do some in-depth consideration of your writing--- particularly at the sentence level---we may turn to Ms. Dobb's excellent set of resources.

Miscellaneous

Rebelsky, Samuel and Stuhr, Rebecca (1999). The Hypermedia Tutorial Web. Online resource available at http://www.math.grin.edu/~rebelsky/Courses/Tutorial/99F/. (Root page created March 22, 1999; Last modified March 23, 1999; Last visited March 23, 1999.)

The hypertext document that you are currently reading. Our notes on the subject should appear here throughout the semester.

History

Tuesday, 30 March 1999

Saturday, 21 August 1999


Disclaimer Often, these pages were created "on the fly" with little, if any, proofreading. Any or all of the information on the pages may be incorrect. Please contact me if you notice errors.

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