Fundamentals of CS I (CS151 2001S)

Laboratory: Input and Output

Summary: In this laboratory, you will experiment with the use and application of some of Scheme's basic input and output procedures.

Procedures Covered: read, write, and display.

Contents

Exercises

Exercise 0: Preparation

a. Make sure that you understand what read, write, and display are supposed to do. You may find an old reading on the topic helpful.

b. Start DrScheme.

Exercise 1: Simple Input and Output

Consider the following sequence of Scheme commands:

(display "Please enter a value and I will square it: ")
(define val (read))
(define val-squared (* val val))
(display (string-append "The value of "
                        (number->string val)
                        " squared is "
                        (number->string val-squared)))
(newline)

a. What do you expect the code to do?

b. Verify your answer via experimentation.

Exercise 2: Running from the Command Line

a. Save the above code in a file (e.g., square.ss).

b. Open a terminal window.

c. In that terminal window, type

mzscheme -r file.ss

d. Reflect on what happened. Did you need to type any Scheme? Could someone else use step c without understanding the underlying Scheme?

Exercise 3: Local Input Values

Rewrite the code in exercise 1 to use let or let* (or both) rather than define.

Exercise 4: Computing Roots of a Quadratic Equation

a. Write a Scheme program that reads in the three coefficients of a quadratic equation (the a, b, and c in ax2 + bx + c) and prints out the roots of the equation. You should model this program on exercise 3.

b. Save the program in a file and execute it from the command line.

c. Reflect as in exercise 2d.

Exercise 5: Repetition

Update your answer to number 3 so that your program repeatedly asks for a value and computes its square root. You will probably need to

a. Put the stuff (request for value, computation of a value, display of that value) in a procedure.

b. Have that procedure recurse.

c. Decide upon a base case to stop recursion. (I'd suggest that you stop when someone enters something other than a number.)

Exercise 6: Debugging

Consider the following updated version of the assoc-all procedure the we wrote together in class. It is updated in that we have added five lines that let us display what's going on as the procedure is called.

(define assoc-all
  (lambda (key database)
    (display "Searching for ")
    (display key)
    (display " in ")
    (display database)
    (newline)
    ; Nothing can be in the empty database, so return false.
    (if (null? database)
        #f
        ; If we match the car of the database, look in the rest.
        (if (equal? key (car (car database)))
            ; If the key does not appear any more in the database
            ; make a list of just the one value we've seen
            (if (not (assoc-all key (cdr database)))
                (list (car database))
                ; Otherwise, attach the matched entry to
                ; the remaining matched entries
                (cons (car database) (assoc-all key (cdr database))))
            ; We didn't match the car, so just look in the rest
            (assoc-all key (cdr database))))))

a. What do you expect to happen for each of the following calls? Verify your answer through experimentation.

i.

(assoc-all "Sam" null)

ii.

(assoc-all "Sam"
           (list (list "Sam" "A")

iii.

(assoc-all "Sam"
           (list (list "Rebelsky" "A")

iv.

(assoc-all "Sam"
           (list (list "Sam" "A")
                 (list "Sam" "B")
                 (list "Sam" "C")
                 (list "Sam" "D")
                 (list "Sam" "E")))

iv.

(assoc-all "Sam"
           (list (list "Sam" "A")
                 (list "John" "B")
                 (list "Sam" "C")
                 (list "Jack" "D")
                 (list "Joe" "E")))

b. Explain the results.

 

History

Friday, 2 March 2001

 

Disclaimer: I usually create these pages on the fly. This means that they are rarely proofread and may contain bad grammar and incorrect details. It also means that I may update them regularly (see the history for more details). Feel free to contact me with any suggestions for changes.

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