HOW TO REBOOT MATHLAN WORKSTATIONS

Rebooting from Windows into Linux

If you are not logged in under Windows

You'll see a window on screen. Read the title bar.

If you are logged in under Windows

Move the mouse pointer to the Start button in the lower left corner of the screen and click the left mouse button. A menu appears.

On this menu, move the mouse pointer onto the phrase Shut Down ... and click the left mouse button. A window entitled ``Shut Down Windows'' appears; it contains either a rectangular box with a downward-pointing triangle at its right end or a list of options, each preceded by a circular radio button.

The workstation now shuts itself down and brings itself back up automatically.

By default, MathLAN workstations boot the Linux operating system, so no further input from the user is needed. The process normally takes about a minute. It is complete when the Linux login panel appears on the screen.

Rebooting from Linux into Windows

If you are not logged in under Linux

The Linux login box should be visible. Move the mouse pointer onto the word System at the top of the box and click the left mouse button. A two-option menu appears.

On this menu, move the mouse pointer onto the word Reboot and click the left mouse button. A confirmation box (``Are you sure you want to reboot the machine?'') appears.

Move the mouse pointer onto the button labelled Yes at the bottom of the confirmation box and click the left mouse button. The workstation shuts itself down and begins to restart itself.

After thirty or forty seconds, a screen will appear, showing the Red Hat logo on a white background. At the right, there will be a list of available operating systems. Press the down-arrow key two or three times, to select win or dos on that list (the two are completely equivalent). Then press the <Enter> key. The rest of the process is automatic and normally takes about one minute. It is complete when the VirusScan logo superimposed on the Windows login box disappears from the screen.

If you are logged in under Linux

Save any files that are open and close your windows.

Move the mouse pointer onto the GNOME footprint icon in the lower left corner of the screen and click with the left mouse button. On the menu that appears, move the mouse pointer onto the phrase Log out and click the left mouse button. A logout confirmation box will appear.

In the confirmation box, move the mouse pointer onto the small diamond-shaped radio button next to the word Reboot and click the left mouse button.

Still in the confirmation box, move the mouse pointer onto the button labelled Yes and click the left mouse button. The screen changes to display only a password box.

Type your MathLAN password into the box and press the <Enter> key. The workstation shuts itself down and begin to restart itself.

After thirty or forty seconds, a screen will appear, showing the Red Hat logo on a white background. At the right, there will be a list of available operating systems. Press the down-arrow key two or three times, to select win or dos on that list (the two are completely equivalent). Then press the <Enter> key. The rest of the process is automatic and normally takes about one minute. It is complete when the VirusScan logo superimposed on the Windows login box disappears from the screen.

Problems in booting Windows

When the Windows operating system is booted, it often discovers that the previous Windows session ended in a system crash rather than in a normal shutdown. When this happens, the file system stored on the hard disk usually needs to be repaired. Windows notifies the user of the problem as follows:

Windows was not properly shut down.  One or more of your disk drives may
have errors on it.  Press any key to run ScanDisk on these drives ...

If you see this message, you can either press a key or wait for a minute or so. In either case, Windows will start the ScanDisk disk-repair program.

Often ScanDisk eventually reports that it has discovered a region of the disk that might contain a ``lost file'' and ask for your permission either to save it or to delete it. The common practice is to delete it by pressing the <L> key.

ScanDisk then warns you that it is about to effect changes, presumably repairs, to the hard disk and suggests that you might want to prepare for them by making an ``undo'' disk, which would enable you to reverse the changes if they turn out to be a bad idea. To make an ``undo'' disk, put a blank diskette into the floppy drive and then press the <U> key; to skip this step, press the <S> key.

In either case, ScanDisk should then be able to finish its disk checks and resume the booting process.

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Validated as XHTML 1.0 Strict by the World Wide Web Consortium

created July 13, 2000
last revised August 12, 2001

John David Stone (stone@cs.grinnell.edu)